Uenuku Charitable Trust Mandated

Crown recognised the mandate of Uenuku Charitable Trust to negotiate a comprehensive historical Treaty settlement on behalf of Te Korowai o Wainuiārua.

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Crown signs Terms of Negotiation

February 20, 2017
Crown signs Terms of Negotiation with Te Korowai o Wainuiārua.

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FULL DOCUMENT – CLICK HERE

Agreement in Principle

November 23, 2018
Agreement in Principle signed between Te Korowai o Wainuiārua and the Crown, laying the foundation for the settlement.

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Deed of Settlement Initialling

Te Korowai o Wainuiārua initialling deed of settlement, Parliament, Wellington, Monday 12 December 2022. Credit: Hagen Hopkins.

December 12, 2022
Te Korowai o Wainuiārua and the Crown initial Te Tihi o te Rae, the Deed of Settlement outlining all compensation and redress related to historical Treaty claims up to September 12, 1992.

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Ratification

Te Korowai o Wainuiārua initialling deed of settlement, Parliament, Wellington, Monday 12 December 2022. Credit: Hagen Hopkins.

May 29, 2023
Ratification:Iwi members endorsed and approved the Deed of Settlement and the establishment of Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Trust as the Post Settlement Governance Entity (PSGE).

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Deed of Settlement signing

July 29, 2023
Deed of Settlement signing by trustees of Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Trust and the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations and the Minister of Finance on behalf of the Crown.

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Legislative Process Starts

April 11, 2024
Legislative Process Starts (WE ARE NOW HERE)

The Crown introduces Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Claims Settlement Bill into Parliament, which undergoes a legislative process lasting between 12-24 months, including a Select Committee review.

The First Reading took place of April 11, 2024 The Bill goes through the Second and Third Readings in Parliament, and receives the Royal Assent, becoming law. Date of the second and third readings TBC

Settlement Date/Asset Transfer
After the Bill is passed into law, the transfer of settlement assets takes place.

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1st reading, Parliament, Wellington, New Zealand, Thursday 11 April 2024. Credit: Hagen Hopkins.

Following the First Reading of the Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Claims Settlement Bill, the Māori Affairs Select Committee has opened public submissions.

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Submissions close 11:59pm on 26 May 2024.


Claims Settlement Bill – First Reading

A small delegation of 30 representatives traveled to Parliament to witness the First Reading of Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Claims Settlement Bill on April 11.

The First Reading marks the beginning of a crucial legislative process aimed at addressing historical grievances between Te Korowai o Wainuiārua and the Crown.

Reflecting on the emotional atmosphere of the First Reading, Te Korowai o Wainuiārua
Chairman Aiden Gilbert said that although he had been to a few First Readings to tautoko other iwi, this reading was quite different.

“There was a wairua in the room I’d not experienced before,” he said.

Mr Gilbert’s sentiments echoed the profound sense of unity and reverence felt by all present.
“To see the overwhelming support from both sides of the house was quite touching…and to witness Ministers recognising the injustice done by the Crown to our people had me lost for words,” he said.

Acknowledging the challenges endured by generations past, Mr Gilbert honored the tūpuna who endured the fight and persevered in hope for the future.

The Bill was introduced to Parliament by Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations Hon Paul Goldsmith who acknowledged the long journey since the first Te Korowai o Wainuiārua Wai claims were submitted back in the 1980s, and urged the swift progression of the bill to the Māori Affairs Committee.

During the reading of the bill, several Members of Parliament spoke passionately about its significance, and the divisiveness of the settlement process. Although there was unanimous support for the bill, differing opinions of full and final settlement were made clear.

Steve Abel from the Green Party expressed deep respect and empathy for Uenuku, Tamakana and Tamahaki, commending our willingness to engage in the “divisive” settlement process and restore the Crown’s honour.